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4 Ways Employees Compromise Security (And How You Can Solve Them)

Employee carelessness could lead to a data breach that can destroy your business. Read on to discover how workers can undermine your company’s security.

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cybersecurity is essential to the global supply chain

Employees, in a perfect world, would have great cybersecurity habits. They will make sure never to place their company’s data or network at risk.

This isn’t a perfect world, though. Although office workers can be trustworthy and loyal, the lack of IT policies and occasional carelessness could cause a harmful data breach that can ruin your business reputation and shutter your company.

How can employees compromise your enterprise data security?

Here are four ways they can put your sensitive private and customer data at risk:

1. Insider Malice

No business manager or owner likes to think that their trusted business partners or the people on their team have it out for them. Sadly, a few bad apples can sometimes get past human resources or talent acquisition. The worst part is that malicious insider attacks are incredibly difficult to detect.

You can prevent or mitigate insider malice by getting to know the mind of your attacker. Put yourself in the shoes of a dissatisfied worker looking to take down their employer. You probably wouldn’t launch an attack while you’re using the company computer and still on the corporate payroll.

You would, however, be likely to launch a cyberattack a few days before or after your last day. If you still have your company e-mail and VPN login (and they still work), you could get into your ex-company’s servers from the comfort of your home.

Small Size Businesses Here is What You Need to Know About Cyber Security

As a business owner, you should take measures to prevent disgruntled and malicious employees from compromising your company’s IT and network infrastructure. Start by limiting privileged access to sensitive data, such as intellectual property, personally identifiable information and customer details. Then, immediately revoke the access rights of employees who resign or leave your company without notice.

Also, try getting cloud software that can back up and protect your data. You could, for instance, purchase and download an Office 365 e-mail backup solution to make sure that your e-mail data stays protected and is easily recoverable in the event of a cyberattack or a security threat.

2. The Use of Weak or Lazy Passwords

According to a report from PCMag, the top three common passwords for 2020 are picture1, 123456789 and 123456. These passwords are so laughably insecure that you’re practically rolling out the red carpet for hackers and other cybercriminals.

When you have employees adhering to poor password practices, you need to create and implement a strong password policy to prevent an enterprise data security disaster. Make sure your workers receive a notification to change their passwords every quarter. What’s more, the new password must adhere to the following requirements:

  • It shouldn’t match the previous passwords.
  • It must contain at least nine characters (the longer, the better).
  • It needs to include a combination of symbols, uppercase and lowercase letters and numbers.

Changing and memorizing a long, complex password can be highly inconvenient for some employees. One trick to creating this kind of password is to learn a sentence only you can identify.

Take this sentence as an example: “My best friend munches a batch of French fries.” Turn that into an acronym, and you’ve got: MbfmabofFf. You could turn the letter “o” into a zero, then add the birth date of your best friend (or whatever special number you feel like adding). Finally, start or end the password with a symbol.

3. Web Surfing

Office workers often use the company’s internet to surf the web during lunch breaks or downtime. If your tech staff doesn’t protect and configure your systems properly, employees may come across websites with malware, which can cause machines and other devices to become infected.

As a business owner or manager, you can restrict access to specific sites that your company or tech team determines as dangerous or inappropriate. Although this tactic works well for known and distinctive destinations, it may be time-consuming and complex to administer.

If you insist on this strategy, make sure to supplement it by securing systems with anti-spyware and anti-virus software. What’s more, train your employees on the value of staying careful on the web.

Small Size Businesses Cyber Security

4. Malicious E-mail and Phishing

Fraudulent e-mails can destroy your company’s IT and network security, as well as compromise your data. They may contain harmful attachments, codes or links that give cybercriminals access to devices and data.
You can stop these malicious e-mails from harming your business by educating your workers about recognizing suspicious e-mails.

A few of the red flags they should look for include the following:

  • Offers and promotions that are “too good to be true.”
  • Unwarranted technical or customer support
  • Popular companies with deceptive URLs and misspelt names, such as amaz0n3 (dot) com.
  • Unsolicited or suspicious downloads or attachments.

You hired your employees to help grow your business – not destroy it with poor cybersecurity practices. Implement strict IT policies and use the right tools that can protect your organization from criminals.

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Business

Top 5 Tech Blog Earnings That Will Amaze You

Blogging requires minimal business investment and is often started of passion. These top 5 tech bloggers teach us how to make money out of blogging.

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Rules to Fictional Blogging - TwinzTech Blog

Blogging has now branched into different variants like traditional blogging, third-party platform blogging, and social media micro-blogging.

To stay in the present, people from different walks of life are indulging in tech blogs. We have analyzed the top 5 tech blogs’ key success points to motivate more tech bloggers.

Top-Earning Tech Blogs that are Worth your Time

Blogging requires minimal business investment and is often started of passion. These top 5 tech bloggers teach us how to make money out of blogging. With so many successful tech bloggers across the globe, the downsides of blogging are hard to find.

1. Engadget

Earnings per year – $47.5 million

Engadget publishes content on a vast range of relevant tech topics. You will find content on robotics, wearables, search engines, smartphone games, and whatnot!

Founded by Peter Rojas (a former editor of Gizmodo) in 2004, Engadget has estimated annual earnings of $47.5 million, making it to the top of the tech blog posts table. Peter Rojas, however, left Engadget in 2008. AOL acquired Engadget in 2011, and the famous Verizon Media currently owns it.

Engadget uses affiliate links within its product reviews as a monetization option. You will find these links as a call-to-action button labelled as ‘Buy Now. The main navigation of Engadget’s product reviews gives due prominence to affiliate revenue-generating links.

2. Wired

Earnings per year – $30.7 million

Launched by Louis Rossetto and Jane Metcalfe, Wired is currently owned by Condé Nast. Wired.com was formerly known as HotWired and Wired News. It was founded in October 1993 and later split into a magazine and website in the late ’90s.

Lycos bought the website, which Condé Nast later purchased on July 11, 2006. To do away with the declining profits, the two branches were again reunited.

Wired.com (the website) is paywalled, which requires users to make a payment for accessing more than four articles each month.

Wired hosts various technology blog content on new products, tech businesses, video games, cameras, security, and the like. The website uses affiliate links and other commercial revenue-generating tools to boost its earnings.

This website is ideal for tech professionals looking for the latest gadgets, reviews, or tech discoveries.

Top 5 Tech Blog Earnings That Will Amaze You

3. Mashable

Earnings per year – $30 million

Founded by Pete Cashmore in 2005, Mashable is a tech and media blog. Pete Cashmore is a web consultant aged just 19-years from Aberdeen.

Mashable covers a broad spectrum of tech topics. This blog has learned what commercial revenue generation method works the best for itself. Mashable teaches fellow bloggers to add elements that drive revenue in their blogs.

Mashable Deals is the monetization section of this blog post that features reviews, deals, product roundups, links, and several other commercial contents.

Mashable is regarded as one of the most influential tech blogs on the internet now! If you want to catch up with everything happening in the tech world, then Mashable is your go-to site.

4. TechCrunch

Earnings per year – $22.5 million

Founded by Keith Tears and Micheal Arrington, TechCrunch has estimated annual earnings of $22.5 million. TechCrunch received global recognition owing to its advanced tech content and blogs. If you want genuine reviews of tech products, then you must check out TechCrunch.

TechCrunch focuses primarily on global tech giants like Uber, Amazon, Alphabet, and other such companies. TechCrunch is currently edited and owned by Mathew Panzarino.

You will also find many articles related to reviews on the latest tech products, news on tech discoveries, pricing of the latest gadgets, and content on new gadget developments.

TechCrunch ran a famous database, Crunchbase, between the period of 2007 to 2015. However, Crunchbase has a separate entity now.

5. Gizmodo

Earnings per year – $4.8 million

Founded by Peter Rojas in 2002, Gizmodo is a popular tech blog. Gizmodo also covers the content on design, sci-fi, and science. This online platform serves various parts of the world, including the UK, Brazil, and Japan.

Gizmodo is currently owned by the G/O Media and is edited by John Biggs. Gizmodo offers stiff competition to the top tech blog platforms like Engadget.

It provides in-depth reviews on the latest gadgets, smartphone designs, and laptops. Gizmodo uses sponsor ads to monetize its blog posts. It has an estimated visit of 22 million per month with a domain authority of 93.

Closing Thoughts

The primary source of revenue for most tech bloggers is direct advertisements and affiliate links. Technology-related blogs drive a vast audience base which further boosts their income.

Moreover, tech reviews allow tech bloggers to add affiliate links as CTA buttons. You can go through these top 5 tech blogs to learn how to commercialize your tech blogs.

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