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The Most Common Scheduling Problems for Employers and how to Address Them

The Most Common Scheduling Problems for Employers and how to Address Them, Over and Under Staffing, Wrong Predictive Analysis, Balance Shifts

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The Most Common Scheduling Problems for Employers and how to Address Them

Scheduling of employees is one of the most crucial factors determining the success of any business. If employers get it wrong from the start, they might live struggling to meet their targets until they do proper scheduling.

Improper scheduling does not only affect the employees but the employers as well. It could easily cause an unnecessary rise in labour costs and significant losses to the business. Therefore employers must be ready to invest in a scheduling system.

A good example is an online schedule maker, which helps avoid some of the most common scheduling problems. Here are some of the common issues employers encounter and how to solve them.

1. Over and Under Staffing

Over and Under Staffing

When a business makes the mistake of overstaffing, it mostly affects its labour cost. Too many unnecessary staff means you pay employees for services they have not rendered.

When that happens, the company will not manage to meet its price in the long run because it’s wasting money on people it does not need.

Under-staffing has an impact on both employees and the employer. When there are fewer employees than required in a shift, the current employees get overworked.

The company is also forced to pay overtime which is an extra and expensive cost. When the employees get overworked, they lose their morale and may not manage to attend to customers entirely, leading to customer loss.

To avoid both understaffing and overstaffing, employers should invest in a sound scheduling system. A system that can match shifts evenly and inform managers when there’s a need to reduce or increase employees’ number.

2. Wrong Predictive Analysis

When it comes to running any business, employers or managers should observe trends to make better decisions for their companies. If employers fail to keep track of when their businesses experience an increase in activities, they are likely to get understaffed.

The same happens when the business experiences a low season in terms of its activities. If the employers do not keep track of these seasons and reduce the number of employees in advance, they are likely to be overstaffed. Therefore, employers need to be keen on their scheduling system by aligning them with their businesses’ seasons.

3. Failure to Balance Shifts with Availability

Failure to Balance Shifts with Availability

Some employees prefer to work full-time, some part-time and others on weekends only. When employees choose part-time and weekend shifts, they probably have other things to meet their daily needs.

When managers do not consider employees’ opinions and preferences when scheduling, they are likely to experience absenteeism and increased turnover. Employees require to work in an ecosystem they feel appreciated and valued.

Therefore employers should consider designing a scheduling system that allows employees to contribute their opinions and preferences concerning scheduling. Doing so ensures both the employee and the employer are satisfied.

4. Failure to Schedule Some Time Off with Employees

Schedules do not just revolve around the office or business area only. Creating breaks for the employees gives them time to relax, unwind and re-energize, which is crucial for their performance.

A demotivated employee is a liability to the employer because they transfer that energy to the customers, leading to customer service dissatisfaction.

That, in turn, sends away potential or regular customers, reducing profits for the employer.

To counter that, employers should include some time out with the employees. For instance, they can plan to close work early once a month and watch a movie together.

They can also organize some team-building activities every once a month. When employers do this, employees can unwind, relax, and even feel part of a family, motivating them to perform better to afford more.

5. Lack of a Good Structure

You cannot achieve the set goals without a good plan to run the system. Some employers hire employees and leave them to organize themselves, so long as employers can see results.

Apart from that being wrong, there is no responsibility for any losses. Others do not care to match employees’ skills with the right job posts and imagine workers will learn on the go.

To prevent such a problem, a sound scheduling system is necessary to give structure in the business, keeping a record of every employee with the responsibilities assigned and the set goals per individual. It is time employers ditched the pen and paper culture.

Conclusion

As easy and basic as scheduling may sound or appear to many people, it is an essential success tool. If a business has a goal of growing and expanding for the long term, employers need to invest wisely in scheduling.

Before starting on the process, a little knowledge of other employers’ problems when scheduling helps you avoid repeating the same. If you remain an employer and are staring into scheduling, this guide shows you some of the common scheduling issues and how to overcome them.

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Can the UK Host Europe’s First Spaceport?

In the race to launch the first rocket from Europe, can the UK come out on top? With the plans for two new UK spaceports based in Scotland underway, these may present Great Britain’s best chance of success.

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Can the UK Host Europes First Spaceport

The United Kingdom can boast an enviable record of excellence with its contributions to science, engineering, and technology, especially in the field of aeronautics. Therefore, it’s surprising that Great Britain hasn’t yet achieved a vertical rocket launch from the country’s soil, despite the abundance of scientific expertise in its space industry.

Now, the United Kingdom is targeting 10% of the worldwide space industry by 2030, and its success in the endeavor is likely to hinge on the progress of two new UK spaceports.

1. Spaceport Development in the UK

Despite the difficulties posed by the coronavirus pandemic and the continuing fallout from Brexit, the UK is still aiming to build new spaceports on British soil very shortly. The government and space industry hope to boost British enterprise, provide a platform for the nation’s scientific talent, and secure considerable economic benefits.

UK science minister Amanda Solloway stated that the new UK spaceports would “cement the UK’s status as a global space superpower.” The UK already makes sizeable contributions to the global space industry with its technology exports. The annual UK satellite export market is valued at over $300 million, while more than £360 billion of broader UK economic activity is supported by satellite services.

Indeed, small satellite (smallsat) technology promises the most significant short-term growth for the space industry’s future. Many of Britain’s most innovative smallsat companies are located in Scotland, which, combined with the local geography, makes the UK’s northernmost part an ideal base of operations for developing the country’s space industry.

It’s no surprise, then, that Scotland has been chosen as the location for two different spaceports with two very different profiles. While plans for other UK spaceports in Wales and Cornwall are also in progress, if Britain launches Europe’s first vertical rocket, it will likely originate from one Scottish spaceport. Now, it continues to be discussed which will strike first: Space Hub Sutherland or the Shetland Space Centre.

2. Space Hub Sutherland vs. Shetland Space Centre

With a proposed site amidst the beautiful Scottish Highlands on the A’ Mhòine peninsula, the construction of Space Hub Sutherland is scheduled to begin soon, with an eye on launching rockets before the end of 2022. The spaceport will launch rockets carrying payloads of up to 500 kg, the first of which will be a rocket made by Orbex. Although based in Scotland, Orbex’s founders hail from Denmark and Germany, with most of Orbex’s employees working in Denmark rather than in the UK.

spacex Host Europes First Spaceport

This is not the only setback that Orbex and Sutherland Space Hub have had to weather. This is not the only setback that Orbex and Sutherland Space Hub have had to survive. Previously, the American aerospace giant Lockheed Martin had come aboard as a partner at Sutherland Space Hub. However, it seems the US company thought better of the decision, as they have now turned their efforts to the Shetland Space Centre instead.

The original design for the spaceport included two vertical launchpads to enable up to 30 launches every year. However, due to ecological restrictions, the spaceport has been limited to a single launch pad and a maximum of 12 launches every year. It is also unclear why Orbex would have sought a bailout loan despite having secured millions in investment for the project.

Other objections to the Sutherland spaceport have come from Danish billionaire and the richest man in Scotland, Holch Povlsen. The emigrant entrepreneur has cited environmental concerns that conflict with the work done by his Wildland firm, which aims to rewild the Scottish Highlands. However, it’s also worth noting that Povlsen has a £1.4 million stake in the competing Shetland Space Centre, which he argues has more potential for success.

Shetland Space Centre is also looking to be up and running with its first rocket launch by the end of 2022, from a site in Lamba Ness on Unst, one of the Shetland Islands. The plans boast three launchpads capable of launching payloads of up to 1,000 kg for up to 30 launches every year. Lockheed Martin is partnering with space technology firm ABL Space Systems for a series of maiden launches from the spaceport.

Although the project promises to contribute £5 million to the local economy, planning approval has yet to be granted. The preferred site will require the demolition of a Second World War radar facility, which Historic Environment Scotland has argued is too high a price to pay. Suggested suitable alternatives could easily be found elsewhere.

3. When Will UK Spaceports Be Operational

The coronavirus pandemic has caused mass disruption to almost every industry on Earth, and the commercial space sector is no different. That said, the global space industry continued to grow in 2020, which is perhaps a testament to the sector’s future-proof potential. Suppose the UK is serious about leveraging its space industry to acquire a share of this market.

In that case, UK spaceports will have to be constructed before long, especially if Great Britain wants to realize its ambitions of becoming the first European nation to play host to a vertical rocket launch. Meanwhile, on the continent, countries such as Germany, Sweden, France, Norway, and Portugal, are all working towards making their space industries sufficiently competitive to increase their global market shares.

What are the uses of satellites

  • Television
  • Telephones
  • Navigation
  • Space science
  • Weather
  • Environmental monitoring
  • Safety
  • Land stewardship

4. Conclusion: Healthy Competition

The UK spaceports planned for Scotland both face their own set of challenges. Neither the Shetland Space Centre nor Sutherland Space Hub will find themselves wanting for customers if one or both of them can demonstrate the capacity for successful vertical rocket launches. However, the presence of two different spaceports in Scotland can only help to improve Britain’s overall ability for commercial space launches that are likely to make the country an attractive proposition for future investment.

The global satellite market proliferates as more and more industries rely on satellite technology to stay competitive. If these UK spaceports can establish themselves as Europe’s premier launch facilities, both the spaceport developers and the broader British economy are sure to reap the benefits.

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